Saturday, 13 January 2018

A Return To Winter ...... Almost

We had some lovely rain yesterday morning and it remained overcast all day, but it was still very warm and humid. I wasn't expecting it to rain today, but it has and the temperature has dropped enough that I almost need to put on a cardigan or jumper. 


I wish the weather would stay like this, but I know that tomorrow we will be back to summer and that autumn is still a long way off, so I'm going to enjoy today while it lasts.

For those of you who still read this blog (does anyone?) I just wanted to let you know that I will be changing the name of the blog sometime next week to http://simpleeverydayliving.blogspot.com.au/. My interests have changed over the past twelve months and while I still enjoy gardening and grow vegetables,  it isn't such a big part of my life anymore. I will still be writing posts about gardening it just won't be the main focus of the blog anymore, instead I will posting about the everyday things that bring me joy, like a rainy, cool day in the middle of summer. Enjoy what's left of the weekend and I hope you will continue to visit to see how the blog develops. 

Monday, 25 September 2017

Bloomin' Lovely - Winter

I know its been a long time between posts, but seeing that this is a blog mostly about vegetable gardening and there hasn't been anything being produced in the vegetable garden there really hasn't been anything to write about.

Now that spring has arrived the plants in the vegetable garden are slowly starting to produce, but nothing of significance, so today I thought I would share some of the flowers that have been blooming in my garden over winter.

Jonquils, one of my favourite flowers, their fragrance always takes me back to my childhood and my mother's garden.

 Another one from my childhood, Snowdrops.

The calendulas have been blooming for months now and show no signs of stopping anytime soon.


Carnations make a lovely addition to any flower garden, this one  was grown from a cutting taken from a store bought bunch.

Looking like a mound of snow in the garden Alyssum are a favourite with the bees.

Marguerite daisy, the blackbirds have built a nest in this one and there was at last count three eggs in it.

White oxalis

And finally tiny pink flowers on one of my succulents, it is the first time it's flowered.

Hopefully I will be back in a few days with an update on the vegetable garden, I hope your gardens are bloomin' lovely too.

Sunday, 25 June 2017

Growing Asparagus

Asparagus is easily one of my favourite vegetables, and the best thing is that it is also one of the easiest veggies to grow and will supply you with delicious spears for twenty years or more if properly cared for.  

Bare rooted asparagus crowns can be bought from most garden centres or nurseries, as well as online and are usually planted out during winter through to early spring. Choose a sunny position with well draining soil that  has been enriched with plenty of organic matter, well rotted horse manure would be a good choice if you can get hold of some, plant crowns at least 10cm deep and between 35 - 40cm apart.  

During the first year of growth it is very important that the spears are not harvested as this will weaken the plant, a light harvest can be made in the second year, and in the years to follow the spears can be harvested every two to three days (they grow very quickly) over a six week period. Any spears that appear after that time should be left to grow into fronds. Pick only those spears that are at least as thick as a finger, and 15 - 20cm tall, any spears smaller than that should be left to grow. Keep your asparagus well watered during spring and summer and fertilise with pelletised chicken manure once harvesting has been completed.

Asparagus can also be grown from seed, but it will be three years before any spears will be able to be harvested.  

Asparagus fronds will start to turn yellow during the winter and this is when they will need to be cut down to ground level and the asparagus bed covered in a good thick layer of compost or manure, followed by a layer of straw, this will give them a good start when they start to grow again in spring.
Asparagus fronds ready to be cut down.
See, easy, the hardest part is waiting until you can harvest, but it is definitely worth the wait.

Sunday, 21 May 2017

Finished ...........Finally

I started it last winter and put it away when the weather started to warm up. I took it up again three months ago and have been working on it almost every night for two or three hours at a time. There are eighty 15 centimetre (or there about's) squares made up of thirteen different patterns, and it measures 206 centimetres x 167 centimetres. It used over 5,000 metres of yarn and weighs 2.5 kilos and I'm so happy it's finally finished, I will never, ever make a blanket this size using squares again.

The squares are joined using Celtic lace join which looks difficult, but is quite easy to do once you get the hang of it. You can find the pattern here.


The border was made using the  Vibrant Vintage CAL border found here at Cypress Textiles.

The patterns I used for the squares were:
Antique Pearls by Priscilla Hewitt

Bubbles Baby Stitch by Deneen St. Amour

Counterpoint by Joyce Lewis

Harriett by Caroline Christmas

Just Peachy Blossom by Donna Mason-Svara

Melissa Square by Rachele Carmona

More V's Please by Melinda Miller

Solid Granny Square by Craft Passion

Traditional Granny Square  -  You can find a tutorial here

Victorian Lace Square by Destany Wymore

Plus, these three that I have no pattern for and cannot remember what they are called or who created them.


If you are the creator of these squares or know who created them, please let me know as I like to give credit where it is due.

So now that that's finished, I've moved on to something a bit different.
A sweet,vintage granny shawl in autumnal hues. The pattern was created by Kirsten, and you can find it here. I'll do a blog post about it when it's finished.







Sunday, 7 May 2017

If You Thought Terracotta Pots Were Just For Plants

You may need to think again.
Below are some pretty, practical and creative uses for terracotta pots with hardly a plant in sight.


A pretty shabby chic bird bath that could also be used to hold a candle, pot pourri,  soaps or jewellery.

A sweet little bird feeder.

As cutlery holders for a party or for everyday use.
Source unknown

They make an attractive drink coolers
One Kings Lane

They can be used to make adorable fairy gardens.
The Flower Market

Genevieve Gail

Or to add some playfulness to the garden.
All Stuff

Or you could use them to make a sweet set of wind chimes.
Source unknown
And finally they would make a cute centrepiece at a child's birthday party or a baby shower when used as cup cake holders.
Source unknown



Disclaimer: I try to give credit to the owners of all the images I use, sometimes this is not possible, those images where the source is unknown will be assumed to be in the public domain. If you are the owner of any of these images (source unknown) and would like them removed or credit added, please let me know.